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Outre-Mer Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Outre-Mer

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Published
ISBN : 9781230235875
Paperback
32 pages
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Ce livre historique peut contenir de nombreuses coquilles et du texte manquant. Les acheteurs peuvent generalement telecharger une copie gratuite scannee du livre original (sans les coquilles) aupres de lediteur. Non reference. Non illustre. 1835MoreCe livre historique peut contenir de nombreuses coquilles et du texte manquant. Les acheteurs peuvent generalement telecharger une copie gratuite scannee du livre original (sans les coquilles) aupres de lediteur. Non reference. Non illustre. 1835 edition. Extrait: ...hill, and descended into the Roman Forum by the broad staircase that leads to the triumphal arch of Septimius Severus. Close upon my right-hand stood the three remaining columns of the Temple of the Thunderer, and thebeautiful Ionic portico of the Temple of Concord, --their base in shadow, and the bright moonbeam striking aslant upon the broken entablature above. Before me rose the Phocian column--an isolated shaft, like a thin vapour hanging in the air scarce visible- and far to the left the ruins of the Temple of Antonio and Faustina, and the three colossal arches of the Temple of Peace--dim, shadowy, indistinct--seemed to melt away and mingle with the sky. I crossed the Forum to the foot of the Palatine, and ascending the Via Sacra, passed beneath the Arch of Titus. From this point, I saw below VOL. II. P me the gigantic outline of the Coliseum, like a cloud resting upon the earth. As I descended the hillside, it grew more broad and high--more definite in its form, and yet more grand in its dimensions--till from the vale in which it stands encompassed by three of the Seven Hills of Rome--the Palatine, the Caelian, and the Esquiline--the majestic ruin in all its solitary grandeur swelled vast to heaven. A single sentinel was pacing to-and-fro beneath the arched gateway, which leads to the interior, and his measured footsteps were the only sound that broke the breathless silence of the night. What a contrast with the scene which that same midnight hour presented, when, in Domitians time, the eager populace began to gather at the gates, impatient for the morning sports! Nor was the contrast within less striking. Silence, and the quiet moonbeams, and the broad, deep shadows of the...